<b>Professor Jenny Stow</b><br>
IMB Deputy Director (Research) and Group Leader, Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine Division<br>
Investigator, Centre for Inflammation and Disease Research<p>
P: +61 7 3346 2110<br>
E: j.stow@imb.uq.edu.au<p>
<b>Keywords</b><br>
- inflammation<br>
- inflammatory diseases<br>
- bacteria and infection<br>
- macrophage biology<br>
- cancer<br>
- imaging<br>
- microscopy
Professor Jenny Stow
IMB Deputy Director (Research) and Group Leader, Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine Division
Investigator, Centre for Inflammation and Disease Research

P: +61 7 3346 2110
E: j.stow@imb.uq.edu.au

Keywords
- inflammation
- inflammatory diseases
- bacteria and infection
- macrophage biology
- cancer
- imaging
- microscopy

Visit the Stow Lab website for more information.

Protein trafficking and inflammation

Proteins are ‘trafficked’ or moved around within our cells and then released as a means of communication between cells. This process is fundamental to many diseases ranging from infection to cancer. 

Our laboratory aims to piece together the trafficking highways and regulators in cells of our immune system and major organs. Understanding this trafficking network will allow us to manipulate cells in disease, improving our use of existing drugs and identifying targets for developing new drugs.

A major focus of our research is investigating how white blood cells make and release chemical messengers called cytokines, which mount an immune response by recruit other cells to sites of infection. These cytokines are critical for fighting off infectious bacteria and other microbes. But when it comes to cytokines, too much is not a good thing. Excessive release of cytokines causes inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and diabetes. Our laboratory is identifying the genes and proteins that can be targeted to enhance cytokines in infection and reduce them in inflammatory disease.

We also study how immune cells ‘phagocytose’, or eat bacteria, a process that normally results in these microbes being digested and killed. However, some bacteria can avoid dying after being phagocytosed and instead they grow inside our cells, causing diseases ranging from food poisoning and typhoid fever to respiratory infections.

As part of a national research program, we are working to investigate and document the many bacterial and host cell genes that allow some bacteria to escape our immune systems. We are learning from the bacteria about how to manipulate our own cells. This research aims to develop new vaccines, antibiotics and other treatments to increase our ability to avoid or fight infectious diseases.

Our recent discoveries include identifying new genes that control cell signalling and cytokine secretion in macrophages. We are also testing some existing drugs for new applications in treating inflammation and infection, and we have developed new methods for analysing immune responses and protein interactions.

Make a difference to Professor Stow's research by donating today.

Research in the news

July 2014 — Video: Solving our global challenges through research

16 July 2014 — New molecular targets could help your body ‘switch off’ inflammation

8 June 2013 — UQ scientists lead the search for better legionella treatments

Research training opportunities

Please see IMB's postgraduate website for more information. 

Key publications

View more publications by Professor Stow via Pubmed or via UQ Researcher.

Luo L, Wall AA, Yeo JC, Condon ND, Norwood SJ, Schoenwaelder S, Chen KW, Jackson S, Jenkins BJ, Hartland EL, Schroder K, Collins BM, Sweet MJ, Stow JL. (2014) Rab8a interacts directly with PI3Kγ to modulate TLR4-driven PI3K and mTOR signalling. Nature Communication 5:4407.

Low PC, Manzanero S, Mohannak N, Narayana VK, Nguyen TH, Kvaskoff D, Brennan FH, Ruitenberg MJ, Gelderblom M, Magnus T, Kim HA, Broughton BR, Sobey CG, Vanhaesebroeck B, Stow JL, Arumugam TV, Meunier FA. 2014. PI3Kg inhibition reduces TNF secretion and neuroinflammation in a mouse cerebral stroke model. Nature Communication 5:3450.

Luo L, King NP, Yeo JC, Jones A, Stow JL. 2014 Single-step protease cleavage elution for identification of protein-protein interactions from GST pull-down and mass spectrometry. Proteomics 14:19-23.

Stanley AC, Wong CX, Micaroni M, Venturato J, Khromykh T, Stow JL, Lacy P. 2014. The Rho GTPase Rac1 is required for recycling endosome-mediated secretion of TNF in macrophages. Immunology Cell Biology 92: 275-86.

Stow JL, Murray RZ. 2013 Intracellular trafficking and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Cytokine Growth Factor Reviews 24:227-39.

Micaroni M, Stanley AC, Khromykh T, Venturato J, Wong CXF, Lim JP, Marsh BJ, Storrie B, Gleeson PA, Stow JL. 2013. Rab6a/a' are important Golgi regulators of pro-inflammatory TNF secretion in macrophages. PLoS One. 8:e57034.

Low, PC, Misaki R, Schroder K, Stanley AC, Sweet MJ, Teasdale RD, Vanhaesebroeck B, Meunier FA, Taguchi T, and Stow JL (2010). Phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ regulates membrane fission of Golgi carriers for selective cytokine secretion. Journal of Cell Biology 190: 1053-65.

Reefman E, Kay JG, Wood SM, Offenhäuser C, Brown DL, Roy S, Stanley AC, Low PC, Manderson AP, and Stow JL. (2010). Cytokine secretion is distinct from secretion of cytotoxic granules in NK cells. Journal of Immunology 184: 4852-62.

Group contacts

Mr Darren Brown
Research staff
+61 7 334 62332
+61 7 334 62336
d.brown@imb.uq.edu.au
Dr Lin Luo
Research staff
+61 7 334 62035
+61 7 334 62332
l.luo@imb.uq.edu.au
Dr Adam Wall
Research staff
+61 7 334 62035
+61 7 334 62332
a.wall@imb.uq.edu.au
Mr Nicholas Condon
Research higher degree student
+61 7 334 62332
+61 7 334 62336
n.condon@imb.uq.edu.au
Professor Jenny Stow
Group leader
+61 7 334 62159
j.stow@imb.uq.edu.au
Dr Fiona Wylie
Research staff
+61 7 334 62332
+61 7 334 62336
f.wylie@imb.uq.edu.au
Mrs Tatiana Khromykh
Research staff
+61 7 334 62332
+61 7 334 62336
t.khromykh@imb.uq.edu.au
Mr Zewen (Kelvin) Tuong
Research higher degree student
+61 7 334 62332
+61 7 334 62336
z.tuong@imb.uq.edu.au
Mr Jeremy Yeo
Research higher degree student
+61 7 334 62332
+61 7 334 62336
j.yeo@imb.uq.edu.au
Dr Nathan King
Research staff
+61 7 334 62035
+61 7 334 62332
n.king@imb.uq.edu.au
Mrs Juliana Venturato
Research staff
+61 7 334 62332
+61 7 334 62336
j.venturato@imb.uq.edu.au
 

 

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